Business Negotiation December 08, 2015

The Past, The Near Future, and The Far Future Partners

Every agreement we make involves the past, the near future (transition period), and the far future.   People, systems, designs, equities, costs quality, production and relationships are affected by new agreements...

Every agreement we make involves the past, the near future (transition period), and the far future.  People, systems, designs, equities, costs quality, production and relationships are affected by new agreements.  Almost every negotiating agreement between two parties in the workplace affects others and their work.

When next you deal with others in the workplace pay close attention to what your “Three Partners” have to say and help the other party also to do so.

Moving from the past to the future is always harder than it appears to be.  The suggestions that follow can make the path less difficult in workplace negotiations.

  1. The “Past Partner” says, “This agreement must specify what we must do as we change from past to new arrangements.” Our work, costs and procedures will change in real and psychological ways.



  1. Old ways and controls must be brought in harmony with new ways.

  2. Conflicts will arise between the old and new that will require early planning and resolution.

  3. The design change now negotiated may profoundly affect production, cost and end-user satisfaction and habits.

  4. Old inventories and equipment have to be disposed of or used in different ways. New purchases may be required to meet the changed design.



  1. The “Transition Partner” says, “On the day and for a short period after we incorporate the new agreement, problems will arise that must be addressed. Chaos will ensue if we don’t take care of these matters now.”



  1. People will not know what to do or how. Training will be needed before the new arrangement goes into effect and immediately after it starts.

  2. No one will know where anything is or how to find it. Old and new ways of doing things will be mixed together in a mess.

  3. Records and recordkeeping will change.

  4. Electrical, physical or computer connections will continue to need changing. We will experience downtime expenses and delays during the transition. Skilled people must be readily available to manage the confusion.



  1. The “Future Partner” says, “As we get into the new agreement and live with it for a while, things are sure to change. Future needs, upgrades and alternatives will arise. Anticipate those needs now.”



  1. Upgrades will be demanded of the new systems or design. Can we get favorable deals now to procure these upgrade options later?

  2. Things break down over time. Can we assure that the same or better service we will need later will be available? Can warranties be lengthened?

  3. At some point in the future the arrangement we are now negotiating will be obsolete. How can we move this to a future agreement?

  4. How can we get the organization to welcome future changes and be part of them when they come?

  5. What improvements or options do we want now that will help in the far future?


 

 
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